Archive for guys and dolls

Guys and Dolls (1955)

Posted in Movie reviews - 1950s, Movies with tags , , , , , , , , on July 1, 2012 by They call me "Mephy"

Guys and Dolls (1955)

Promotional movie poster

Sorry if I haven’t been updating as frequently during my SUMMER BREAK (hey, we all need a vacation…), as well as some romance, real-life, sleep pattern issues. I hope to break the habit eventually when college approaches. Aside from being a fan of stop-motion creativity, I do not shy away from the usually extravagant display of Broadway musicals, which of course always leaves me in a happier mood than I should be.

In the bustling city of New York, we follow two stories of conflict between two greatest rival: love and money. Nathan Detroit (Frank Sinatra) is the operator of “New York’s Oldest Established Permanent Floating Crap Game in New York” (well, they all claim that.) but is also in need of a new spot for his business; this involves the payment of $1000 to rent out the Biltmore Garage, which he doesn’t have at the moment. He decides to make a bet on a high-rolling gambler, Sky Masterson (Marlon Brando), whom has a reputation for betting on anything, is around and offers him a proposition: Take a certain Salvation Army doll named Sarah Brown (Jean Simmons) to Havana, Cuba for a date; if he fails, he pays the 1 grand. Meanwhile, Nathan’s sweetheart, Miss Adelaide (Vivian Blaine, reprising her Broadway role), is frustrated by his involvement with the craps game and her 14-years engagement with him because she wishes he would quit and get married with her already.

Apparently, this is sadly the only musical from Joseph L. Mankiewicz (as well as Brando) and to be honest, this was pretty enjoyable. I’ve never watched a film with a young Marlon Brando in it before, so I was not only surprised by his charming appearance but also his singing voice! Sinatra obviously filled his role, being the crooner he is and the chemistry (yeah, chemistry!) between the two pair felt mutual as a good cast would. As for the “interlude” scenes, the opening scene of “dancing” city folks in rush hour was an amusing but somehow natural feeling of what the real thing could be. Even to scenes like a craps game in a sewer ,with gamblers in interpret-dancing in the essence of the gang fights in West Side Stories (1961, which will be reviewed possibly in the later reviews not too far in the future!). It’s definitely a recommendation to anyone with enough tolerance for singing and dancing (a lot of this blogger’s friends aren’t that fond of musicals…) and probably has been performed numerously in school plays. It’s a classic to watch, truth be, and you would surely want to stop by to watch this at least once in your life!

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